On :birdsite: @SamHarrisOrg said:
"Welcome to the panopticon...
China becomes an episode of Black Mirror"
and shared this article:
abc.net.au/news/2018-09-18/chi

to which my response was:
"Give it 5-10 years, then we'll have it too, but with better marketing, but effectively similar.
IIRC Eindhoven has a system (in pilot?) 'similar' as shown in the head picture (Person of Interest style) ... for a snitch city project. Fighting crime and/or terrorism will be used too"

It looks like (especially) Barcelona and Amsterdam at least have some sensible approach wrt 'smart cities':
decorrespondent.nl/8977/zo-voo
(dutch)

Toronto OTOH, holy shit.
theintercept.com/2018/11/13/go

“The genesis of the thinking for Sidewalk Labs came from Google’s founders getting excited thinking of ‘all the things you could do if someone would just give us a city and put us in charge’” - Eric Schmidt

Toronto is getting everything you'd expect when you collaborate with Google:
a dystopian nightmare

Came to that article from The Intercept from theintercept.com/2019/01/28/go which was linked in the article from De Correspondent.

"No Google data is used." claims Bowden from Sidewalk Labs
Further down the article:
"data is sourced from 'Android Phones and Google apps.'" and "based off of Google data."
Who would've thought Google is lying ...

Relevance for this thread:
'Smart Cities' is better marketing.

If you're not careful like Barcelona & Amsterdam, you'll get your panopticon.

aclu.org/blog/privacy-technolo

"With Rekognition*, a government can now build a system to automate the identification and tracking of anyone. If police body cameras, for example, were outfitted with facial recognition, devices intended for officer transparency and accountability would further transform into surveillance machines aimed at the public."

police body cameras for officer transparency and accountability = better marketing

* Amazon service for facial recognition.

That blog post is linked from theintercept.com/2019/02/08/je

"In a separate advisory, the ACLU said of this face-recognition software that Amazon’s “marketing materials read like a user manual for the type of authoritarian surveillance you can currently see in China.”"

Well, this is a surprise ... it turns out I was way too optimistic with my 5-10 years 😕

Lots of Americans seem to love Amazon and Jeff Bezos as he is a self-made billionaire.
Mass surveillance is indeed quite lucrative :-(

Ring CEO Jamie Siminoff emailed out the company’s new mission:
use consumer electronics to fight crime.
“We are going to war with anyone that wants to harm a neighborhood”

Ring is a company now owned by Amazon.

theintercept.com/2019/02/14/am

"Ring products come with access to a social app called Neighbors that allows customers to not just to keep tabs on their own property, but also to share information about suspicious-looking individuals and alleged criminality with the rest of the block."

“The Neighbors App is the new neighborhood watch that brings your community together to help create safer neighborhoods”

That's better marketing for you.

"A Ring video that appears to have been produced for police reveals that the company has gone out of its way to build a bespoke portal for law enforcement officers who want access to the enormous volume of residential surveillance footage generated by customers’ cameras."

This site is called the Ring Neighborhoods Portal

"Not only does this portal allow police to view Ring customers on a handy, Google-powered map, but it also makes requesting customer surveillance video a matter of several clicks."

"Police can select the homes they’re interested in, and Ring takes it from there, creating an auto-generated form letter that prompts users to provide access to their footage."

Technically, you can deny that request ...

“the portal blurs the line between corporate and government surveillance”

I wonder what you can do if you would combine Rekognition with Ring products ...

Wonder no more. Amazon has already filed a patent which combines those 2 technologies.

aclu.org/blog/privacy-technolo

"Amazon is dreaming of a dangerous future, with its technology at the center of a massive decentralized surveillance network, running real-time facial recognition on members of the public using cameras installed in people’s doorbells."

Given the 3rd party doctrine, this is scary as hell 😮

On twitter.com/ring you can see a whole lot of feel-good videos made by Ring's products.

Great marketing.

It also shows you in various posts how much of the neighborhood is being monitored. Constantly.
And cameras which watch the inside of people's house.

I thought Amazon's Echo/Alexa was bad...

To quote :birdsite: escottkey1

"I'm making the point that surrendering your privacy to corporate surveillance devices isn't being treated as seriously as it should be."

Follow

buzzfeednews.com/article/davey

“CBP is solving a security challenge by adding a convenience for travelers”

That's better marketing.

h/t :birdsite: ChristopherA

This one is good too:
“By partnering with airports and airlines to provide a secure stand-alone system that works quickly and reliably, which they will integrate into their boarding process, CBP does not have to rebuild everything from the ground up as *we drive innovation across the travel experience*.”
(emphasis mine)

· · Web · 3 · 0 · 0

theintercept.com/2019/03/20/ro

“further enhance public safety operations in the city”

That's better marketing.

Let's not forget that 'public safety operations' in Duterte's mind is killing everyone you don't like, without trial of course.

"IBM’s installation, known as the Intelligent Operations Center, promised to enhance authorities’ ability to monitor residents in real time with cutting-edge video analytics, multichannel communications technology, and GPS-enabled patrol vehicles."

IBM is also involved with the NYPD "to keep this city safe"

theintercept.com/2018/09/06/ny

"IBM’s first major urban video surveillance project was with the Chicago Police Department and began around 2005"

"By 2012, according to the internal IBM documents, researchers were testing out the video analytics software on the bodies and faces of New Yorkers, capturing and archiving their physical data as they walked in public or passed through subway turnstiles."

China already has what I think CBP wants to achieve:

twitter.com/mbrennanchina/stat
(it's on archive.org but so far the video doesn't load here, which is important)

"Wow! China Airport face recognition systems to help you check your flight status and find the way to your gate. Note I did not input anything, it accurately identified my full flight information from my face!"

Some respond "hell no!"
Others:

“CBP is solving a security challenge by adding a convenience for travelers”

Yeah. About that. Oepsie.
CBP didn't solve a security challenge, but created another one.

washingtonpost.com/technology/

(source: twitter.com/geoffreyfowler/sta)

Who could've possibly predicted that?
So if you could be so kind to get a new face (and renew all the documents that contained your old one), that'd be great.

@FreePietje wow, I didn't know they had exprimented this early in the US. Looks like there's really not much difference with China at this point.
I wonder what's the situation in Europe, could it be that our relative backwardness will preserve us a little longer from this kind of shit?

@Sosthene It either started or massively accelerated (my guess) in 2001 as then the mantra became 'with any means necessary'.
In the article NDAs are mentioned as 'safeguards'. Safeguards from the public finding out that is :-/

In the early days, 'progress' was hampered by technology: low quality cameras, low CPU power and bandwidth to transport all those video streams.
That no longer applies.
Are you familiar with a TV series 'Hunted'? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hunted_(
(since 2016 in .nl; 2018 in .fr)

@Sosthene
I find that absolutely amazing ... and scary as hell.
It gives you a glance at what is currently possible.
Conclusion: if you can manage to stay off the grid entirely, thus give up any sense of a normal life, you have a chance of not getting caught. A Dutch marine managed to do that and won the first (Dutch) season. Another marine did get caught in another season.

The only thing holding it back is policy in which .eu has an advantage. But for how long?
I'm not optimistic about that.

@FreePietje The advantage of rampant data collection and security breaches leaking said data combined with the ever-accelerating machine-learning generation of indistinguishable-from-real footage using said data is that there will be mandate to move away from using such clearly unreliable methods of authentication.

Oh who am I kidding, the people who vacuum up the government budgets to build said systems will conveniently neglect to mention that.

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