RT @EinsteinsAttic
This is not only fucking outrageous, it sets an incredibly dangerous precedent. How can US #PharmaTech possibly be trusted if it thinks it can have exclusive rights over (i.e. 'own') your health data?

HT @glynwintle
boingboing.net/2019/12/12/they

@FreePietje @onepict @EinsteinsAttic @glynwintle the whole healthcare as a business model is a dumpster fire. You want a productive civilised society you provide Universal basic income, education and healthcare. I also think public transport should be free.

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@onepict
I don't know enough about UBI, but I like/agree with the general idea. People naturally want to contribute to society/community and money related stress is far more severe then people think.
I don't think public transport should be free, but (way) cheaper then it is now. I think an incentive not to use it is good.

People in healthcare and education share many treats. With the teacher's strike in the US, many of their demands were for the benefit of their students, not themselves.

@onepict What I especially like about the idea of UBI is that it breaks with the general sentiment that people are bad/lazy UNLESS and UBI assumes the good in people.

I generally agree with (the idea of) capitalism; just not that it's applicable/right in all circumstances.
OTOH the last ~2 decades has made me wonder whether capitalism and ethical behavior are mutually exclusive. Examples in this thread and Vulture Funds, WTF !?!

It's hard for me to reconcile both ideas/observations.

@FreePietje @onepict I know what you mean. Although I think it's entwined with power. Ethics do seem to get thrown out when you are in Power. Look at Blair and Iraq. When you at the top of the pyramid in Capitalism you do have the power to influence /buy governmental influence without being accountable to the people.

@onepict I think that is true too, but it's also true on its own.
slatestarcodex.com/2014/07/30/ (VERY long read, not sure I understand it all) describes capitalism as a perpetual race to the bottom. It is not only theoretically sound, but there are a LOT of real-world examples. Sweatshops f.e. moving from country to country as soon as its workers started making more then $1 a day. We can't have that. Fire escapes? Yeah, that costs too much. Ppl with full-time job who are still homeless/unhoused. Etc.

@onepict That the term 'vulture fund' even exists, says a LOT. Democracy Now has reported several times on what happens/happened in/with Puerto Rico and it's absolutely shocking. It was completely devastated after hurricane Maria, but instead of providing relief/help, it is used to rob PR blind. democracynow.org/2019/2/6/puer
They're also forced to privatize 'everything' for pennies on the dollar so others will make a lot of money in the future at the expense of the population. Where's humanity? 🤷‍♂️

@FreePietje @onepict I think everyone should have a base level on where to start. It's why I love the idea of the baby box in Scotland. If you are rich you don't have to take it. But the value isn't just in the box, but the follow-up healthcare for mum and baby. In Scotland theres starting to be more of a difference in how we see the poor and disabled. Whereas the attitude in England to them has got worse.

@FreePietje @onepict I also have really come to the idea that I hate the very idea of patronage. E.g A smart poor, disadvantaged kid gets a bursary or adopted by a Daddy warbucks type. It doesn't improve the system overall.

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